Why Satellite Might Be a Good Internet Backup Solution

Operating any insurance organization today requires a stable, high-speed Internet connection. Obtaining a premium quote for a prospect, requesting a policy change for an existing client, operating your online agency management system, even making a telephone call — all require Internet access.

satellite internet backup

Because of our dependence on the Internet, I have recommended for many years that every agency make sure they have redundant Internet connections from different service providers. Adding a satellite connection as an Internet backup is a simple and effective disaster recovery option that will go a long way toward helping you make sure you can continue to operate effectively.

Watching the news reports of Hurricane Florence has reminded me that in many cases – especially with natural disasters – even redundant Internet connections may not be enough to keep your organization operating.

Many organizations rely on cellular data cards as an additional Internet backup option in the case of significant damage to their offices. In the event of a natural disaster (hurricane, tornado), cellular service may not be available at all so your data card may not function as a backup.

That’s why satellite Internet backup as an option might be a reasonable alternative for those of you who might experience widespread damage to telephone, Internet, and cellular infrastructures.

Satellite Internet as a disaster recovery backup might also be appropriate if you are unable to obtain multiple separate Internet access in your area.

Recommendation for Internet Backup

Hughes Network Systems has created a solution that will provide you with an Internet connection, even during those unexpected and unwanted outages. In addition to their regular satellite Internet services, they have a new service called HughesNet Internet Continuity that provides a connection during an outage.

HughesNet uses a Wi-Fi modem, an antenna, and radio, along with a special router to switch back and forth between your local wired Internet connection and satellite service. The backup equipment can be purchased or leased. FCC requires that it be professionally installed because of the satellite antenna. As long as power is available to the router, you will have an Internet connection.

The price to use HughesNet Internet Continuity starts at $40 per month for 2 gigs of data. There are several other plans available. I would recommend you use the basic service and add more data when needed.

The downside is satellite Internet speeds are slow with 25 Mbps downloads and uploads at 3 Mbps. However, that will be better than no connection when you need it the most to take care of your customers.

You can learn more about the service here.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

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2 thoughts on “Why Satellite Might Be a Good Internet Backup Solution

  1. Ben, cellular is definitely a better option — if you power and cell towers. In the case of hurricane Michael in the Florida Panhandle that infrastructure is completely gone. So, my recommendation is to evaluate if satellite Internet would be an alternative in an extreme situation.

  2. Hi Steve,

    I’m wondering if and why you might recommend satellite over 4G LTE. It seems like if you already have a cellular phone plane with one of the major providers – you can get a data plan added for internet connectivity for $20-$40/ month with around 20GB data and speeds of 20MB up AND down. You would have to go out and buy a modem for the sim card that would allow you to connect to the network – I have a Cradlepoint modem that accomplishes this (I’m no longer using the modem as my failover router but it does have this capability too in case if you don’t already have this feature built into an existing router. I would think that latency and jitter may even be better in a product like 4G than in satellite but I could be wrong – I’ve not ever had the opportunity to use it.

    Just some thoughts.

    Thanks,

    Ben